What’s The Typical Life Of A Car Battery?

What's The Typical Life Of A Car Battery?

Whenever my battery dies on me, the first thing that goes through my mind is “Why today?” I know I’m not alone in this. No one enjoys being stuck somewhere with a dead battery, even at home.

If you’re wondering what the typical life cycle of a car battery is, then it’s about three years. Higher-end batteries might be rated for 4 or even 5 years. Some drivers get lucky enough to have batteries that last a lot longer.

There are a handful of factors that can drive a car battery (pardon the pun) into early retirement. Leaving an electrical device plugged in or burning your lights all night can do it. High temperatures can accelerate the rate of corrosion, and it never helps for the car to have long-standing times where it’s not driven for multiple weeks at a time.

Extreme temperatures are always bad news for the life of a battery. Batteries are far more likely to go flat or even die during a really cold spell, since firing up the motor in low temperatures takes a lot more effort. More current has to be drawn out of the battery, which just depletes it faster. Alternatively, hot weather itself can lead to more degradation and corrosion in the battery.

Your own driving habits and patterns impact battery life a lot too. If you make a lot of short trips, then it doesn’t leave enough time or distance for your vehicle’s battery to get a full recharge. That can result in an acid imbalance that corrodes the battery, leading to a shorter lifespan. Unsure about your car’s battery life? Get it checked at Leahy’s Auto. They are the number one place to call in your area for auto repairs.

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